TF3SUT’s aprs Info

APRS RAW packet data from RF that TF3SUT-2 decodes can be seen here.
The raw packet stream is updated on 5 minute interval and keeps a day worth of logs.
For information on how to do this, scroll to the bottom of the page.

Status of T2ICELAND server can be found here.

TF3SUT station info

  • Type: W1 Digipeater
  • TNC: Foxdigi with CCW processor.
  • VHF: Wouxun KG-UVD1 @ 144.800MHz TxPower: 36dBm
  • ANT: 1/2 wave TRAM antenna on a pole on my roof.

A map from aprs.fi of TF3SUT


TF3SUT-2 station info

  • Type: W1 Digipeater / TX/RX Internet Gate (Viscous)
  • TNC: TNC-X Raspberry pi shield.
  • VHF: VX-2000 @ 144.800MHz
  • CPU: Raspberry Pi running Debian wheezy.
  • Software: aprx with digipeating and I-gate.
  • It also runs aprsc for T2ICELAND.
  • ANT: 1/4 wave magnetic mount on rooftop. (Plans are up for J-pole antenna)

aprx config file at TF3SUT-2
A map from aprs.fi of TF3SUT-2


 

TF3SUT-9 – Undanfari II

  • Type: 2 Way tracker – TX/RX Internet Gate (when within 3G range)
  • TNC: Byonics TinyTrak 4.
  • VHF: IC-706MKII
  • CPU: IBM Thinkpad x41
  • GPS-A: Garmin GPSMap 276C
  • GPS-B: Garmin GPSMap 60CX
  • Software: SarTrack, I-Gate, message capable and shows position of other RF objects.
  • ANT: 5/8 whip on the fender of my truck.

A map from aprs.fi of TF2SUT-9
Which is my truck, Undanfari II. Send me a message if you see me on the move!


TF3SUT-12

  • Type: 1 way Tracker – TEMP Digipeater
  • TNC: Byonic’s TinyTrak 4.
  • VHF: IC-706MKII
  • GPS: Garmin GPSMap 276C.
  • ANT: 5/8 whip on the fender of my truck.

A map from aprs.fi of TF2SUT-12
Which is my one way tracker, running from my truck: Undanfari II.
Not message capable but can read other’s position and display on my screen.


 

TF3SUT-7

  • Type: 2 way tracker
  • Yaesu VX-8GR.

A map from aprs.fi of TF3SUT-7
Which is a two way tracker and message capable, usually when I’m hiking or on my bicycle.


The How-To:

I rotate the logs from aprx via logrotate.
Edit the /etc/logrotate.d/aprx file, change ‘weekly’ for ‘daily’ and choose
how many days you’d like to keep. 8 days is default, but you can change this to whatever you want to.

 

How do I parse the rf data? Easy. A bit of cronjob hack and a minor bash script.
First, catch the log from aprx:

make a cronjob as a root with

sudo crontab -e

In the crontab you put this line:

*/5 * * * * cp /var/log/aprx/aprx-rf.log /home/user/aprx-rf.log && chmod 777 /home/user/aprx-rf.log

This copies the log file, puts it in your user directory, and changes it’s permission so we can work with it.
Then we make a small bash “script”. I called mine ‘rf-log-splitter’ but you can name it anything you want.
Put this into the file:

#!/bin/bash

# We grab the aprx-rf log and catch all the RF data from it.
# then we parse that into rf.log which is located in your web browser directory, where ever that is…
cat /home/user/aprx-rf.log | grep -v APRSIS > /home/user/www/aprs/rf.log

# where it can be publicly viewed.

save it in your home dir and then open crontab as a regular user.

crontab -e

In there we make a cronjob that runs our rf-log-splitter.

*/5 * * * * sh /home/user/rf-log-splitter

Now we’re updating the rf log every five minutes.
Enjoy!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *